Copyright Criminals Documentary

Copyright Criminals Documentary

Can You Own A Sound?

The Copyright Criminals documentary explores the impact that sampling and remixing has had on modern musicians, veteran performers, and anyone who has listened to contemporary pop hits in the past 20 years. The film is a musical thrill ride, with an intricately layered soundtrack and visual montages that keep viewers moving in their seats. The Funky Drummer Edition includes the original documentary, plus featurettes spotlighting Public Enemy’s Chuck D, James Brown Band drummer Clyde Stubblefield, and Cee-Lo Green—along with the amazing video remix skills of Eclectic Method and other additional content. Copyright Criminals showcases many of hip-hop music’s founding figures like Public Enemy, De La Soul, and Digital Underground—along with emerging hip-hop artists from record labels Definitive Jux, Rhymesayers, Ninja Tune, and more. It also provides an in-depth look at artists who have been sampled, such as Clyde Stubblefield funk legend George Clinton. As artists find ever more inventive ways to insert old influences into new material, this documentary asks a critical question, on behalf of an entire creative community: Can you own a sound?


Interviews with musicians, djs & producers: Public Enemy, De La Soul, George Clinton, Clyde Stubblefield, Eclectic Method, Mix Master Mike, Shock G, Pam the Funkstress, El-P, Mr. Len, Miho Hatori, DJ Spooky, Matt Black, Bobbito Garcia, Prefuse 73, Sage Francis, Prefuse 73, DJ Qbert, Eyedea & Abilities, Pete Rock, and Saul Williams.

Editorial Reviews:

USA Today: “Producers Benjamin Franzen and Kembrew McLeod craft a compelling and insightful documentary illuminating both sides of a hotly debated issue: Should the original artists get paid when someone samples their work? Are current copyright laws out of step with our mashed-up, high-tech culture? Heavy hitters from the world of hip-hop—such as Public Enemy’s Chuck D and members of De La Soul—weigh in, along with producers, lawyers … and musicians.”

Pop Matters: “Benjamin Franzen and Kembrew McLeod’s exceptionally smart and energetic documentary lays out the complexities of sampling—artistic and political, legal and philosophical. Comprised of split screens, overlapping and overlaid sounds, an assemblage of images and noise, the movie effectively stages its argument even as it makes it.”

The Salt Lake Tribune: “I have nothing but praise for the delivery of the message as well as the technical execution. The film covers the major points on both sides of the issue, and while didn’t change my opinion on sampling, it did offer new points that I hadn’t considered. That’s exactly what a documentary should do.”

Markalan - Originally from Cincinnati, Ohio, Markalan moved to Pacific Beach in 1994. During his first four years in San Diego, he worked as a photographer for the United States Navy. Over the past decade, he's been behind the bar or turntables in many of San Diego's nightclubs, and venues. He's shared his musical selections with Southern & Baja California, and the Mayan Riviera. During these years, he could be found exchanging his time for vinyl at Groove Records and Siesta Records. 

He often worked for trade, to support his vinyl addiction. He currently owns over 8,000 records. "Listening to my father's albums is when it all began. Flipping through the stacks, cleaning off the LP, placing the needle on the record, reading the lyrics, studying the artwork, and enjoying the rich analog sound. Sure, there are occasional pops & you might have to clean the record. You actually have to flip the record at the end of the side. It's not a play list or program on shuffle. You are present, involved, and engaged in the listening process. 
Please Keep Vinyl Alive & Support Local Artists!" 
Markalan

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