DION TERRY & SPENSER LITTLE ART SHOW IN NORTH PARK

DION TERRY & SPENSER LITTLE ART SHOW IN NORTH PARK

Over the past three years, you’ve probably seen Dion’s beautiful bird portraits or paintings at FeeLit. His uniquely styled & detailed pieces will be on display tonight with another friend of FeeLit, featured artist, Spenser Little.

Please take this opportunity to support these local artists and our community…

Markalan

*Dion’s prints are available at FeeLit*


cover-artist

San Diego Artist on the cover of this week’s CityBeat

Dion Terry doesn’t typically title his paintings. In fact, “The Spirit of South Dupre,” the painting of the costumed bird on the cover of CityBeat this week, is only the second piece Terry’s ever given a name.

He says the painting—acrylic on a wood panel—was inspired by his recent trip to New Orleans. He and his friends stayed in a house just off of South Dupre Street, and when they first pulled into the neighborhood, there was a bounce house in the middle of the street.

“It was like a ’hood, but some of the greatest people live there,” Terry says. “They’re just so friendly, man.”

While in New Orleans, he and his friends were sitting outside on a porch, sipping wine, and a neighbor dropped by and brought them an extra bottle. Terry tried to give him an art print in return, but the guy wouldn’t accept it. He said the bottle was just a way of welcoming the visitors to the neighborhood.

“You go to New Orleans and you feel how heavy everything is,” Terry says, “and how simple it is at the same time. The history—the fucking history, you know. Fuck. I got back and I painted that. I felt so inspired. I’m still inspired today. I couldn’t name it anything else: ‘The Spirit of South Dupre.’ The people there, they’re so simple. They’re honest, they’re real, you know. It felt good.”

Terry’s work comes directly from his life experiences. Because of that, his style and subject matter change frequently. The image of a bird dressed up as a human, for example, was burned into Terry’s head during a trip to San Francisco. He met an artist who performs taxidermy on animals, then dresses them in little handmade outfits. He couldn’t shake the eerie effect it created, and he’s been painting the series ever since.

His birds could disappear at any moment, though. He’s got a show opening later this week, but he hasn’t even started on most of the work. If he starts too soon, he says there’s a chance he won’t like the work he’s done when it comes time to hang the show.

“I can’t even categorize what I’m doing because it changes so frequently,” Terry says. “My paintings are all from the hip, I guess. It’s everything I’ve learned in my life—going through shit. This is what the outcome is right now.”

Terry grew up on the Navajo reservation near the Four Corners area of the United States, and he’s been drawing since he was a boy. He entered his first drawing contest when he was young—the third or fourth grade—and ended up in third place.

“I drew a G.I. Joe Cobra tank or something,” he said, laughing. “And when I went in and they told me I won, they gave me a curling iron for a prize. So, that was my first award for art. It’s hilarious. But, yeah, I’ve always been drawing—always.”

By Kinsee Morlan

Dion Terry’s work will be featured in a show opening from 6 to 10 p.m. Saturday, December 11th.

Bedouin Vintage Collective, 2621 El Cajon Blvd. in North Park.

Markalan - Originally from Cincinnati, Ohio, Markalan moved to Pacific Beach in 1994. During his first four years in San Diego, he worked as a photographer for the United States Navy. Over the past decade, he's been behind the bar or turntables in many of San Diego's nightclubs, and venues. He's shared his musical selections with Southern & Baja California, and the Mayan Riviera. During these years, he could be found exchanging his time for vinyl at Groove Records and Siesta Records. 

He often worked for trade, to support his vinyl addiction. He currently owns over 8,000 records. "Listening to my father's albums is when it all began. Flipping through the stacks, cleaning off the LP, placing the needle on the record, reading the lyrics, studying the artwork, and enjoying the rich analog sound. Sure, there are occasional pops & you might have to clean the record. You actually have to flip the record at the end of the side. It's not a play list or program on shuffle. You are present, involved, and engaged in the listening process. 
Please Keep Vinyl Alive & Support Local Artists!" 
Markalan

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